With the Photographer Questions Answers MCQ and SAQ

This resource provides With the Photographer Questions Answers Multiple Choice Questions (MCQ) and SAQ and Short Answer Questions (SAQ) by Stephen Leacock. 

These With the Photographer Questions Answers are suitable for students studying under the ICSE Board Class 10, and B.A. 1st Year. The MCQs aim to test students’ comprehension skills, while the SAQs encourage critical thinking and deeper analysis of the text.

The Story, ‘With the Photographer’ in short with Moral 

In “With the Photographer,” the narrator goes to get his photo taken. The photographer tries to change the narrator’s appearance, but the narrator doesn’t like it. He tells the photographer he wants to look like himself. The narrator gets upset and leaves. 

“फ़ोटोग्राफ़र के साथ” में, वर्णनकर्ता अपना फ़ोटो लेने जाता है। फोटोग्राफर वर्णनकर्ता का रूप बदलने की कोशिश करता है, लेकिन वर्णनकर्ता को यह पसंद नहीं आता। वह फोटोग्राफर से कहता है कि वह अपने जैसा दिखना चाहता है। वर्णनकर्ता परेशान हो जाता है और चला जाता है।

The story shows how people should accept themselves for who they are, instead of trying to fit society’s standards of beauty. It encourages readers to embrace their individuality and resist the urge to change themselves to fit in with society’s standards of beauty.

कहानी दिखाती है कि कैसे लोगों को सुंदरता के समाज के मानकों में फिट होने की कोशिश करने के बजाय खुद को वैसे ही स्वीकार करना चाहिए जैसे वे हैं। यह पाठकों को अपने व्यक्तित्व को अपनाने और समाज के सौंदर्य मानकों के अनुरूप खुद को बदलने की इच्छा का विरोध करने के लिए प्रोत्साहित करता है।

With the Photographer Questions Answers MCQ and SAQ
Summary of “With the Photographer” by Stephen Leacock
ICSE Haunted Houses Class 10 Summary Questions Answers

With the Photographer MCQ Questions Answers 

Choose the correct answers to the questions from the given options.

1. What does the narrator want from the photographer?

a) To buy a camera

b) To have his photograph taken

c) To learn photography techniques

d) To become a photographer

Answer: b) To have his photograph taken

2. How does the photographer react when the narrator enters the studio?

a) Joyfully

b) Severely

c) Enthusiastically

d) Indifferently

Answer: b) Severely

3. What does the photographer do after crawling into the machine?

a) Takes a nap

b) Prays

c) Adjusts the camera settings

d) Reads a magazine

Answer: b) Prays

4. What does the narrator do while the photographer is in the machine?

a) Leaves the studio

b) Observes the photographer

c) Reads a book

d) Listens to music

Answer: c) Reads a book

5. What is the photographer described as wearing?

a) A black suit

b) A gray suit

c) A blue suit

d) A brown suit

Answer: b) A gray suit

6. What publications does the narrator read while waiting?

a) Men’s Magazine

b) Ladies Companion, Girls Magazine, Infants Journal

c) Fashion Magazine

d) Science Journal

Answer: b) Ladies Companion, Girls Magazine, Infants Journal

7. How long does the narrator wait before the photographer opens the inner door?

a) 10 minutes

b) 30 minutes

c) 1 hour

d) 2 hours

Answer: c) 1 hour

8. What does the photographer do after looking at the narrator for a second time?

a) Goes for a walk

b) Tears at the cotton sheet and window panes

c) Takes a photograph

d) Calls for assistance

Answer: b) Tears at the cotton sheet and window panes

9. What does the narrator do while the photographer is tearing at the cotton sheet and window panes?

a) Leaves the studio

b) Offers help

c) Reads a book

d) Listens to music

Answer: c) Reads a book

10. How does the narrator describe the photographer’s demeanor after he emerges from the machine?

a) Happy

b) Grave

c) Angry

d) Excited

Answer: b) Grave

11. What does the narrator infer about the photographer’s actions in the machine?

a) He was sleeping

b) He was praying

c) He was adjusting the camera

d) He was checking his phone

Answer: b) He was praying

12. What does the narrator think about his intrusion into the photographer’s privacy?

a) He regrets it

b) He enjoys it

c) He ignores it

d) He forgets about it

Answer: a) He regrets it

13. How does the narrator’s reflection on waiting in the photographer’s studio contribute to the theme of identity in the story?

a) By emphasizing the importance of patience in self-discovery

b) By highlighting the discomfort of confronting one’s own image

c) By showcasing the photographer’s expertise in capturing identity

d) By suggesting the narrator’s indifference to his own appearance

Answer: b) By highlighting the discomfort of confronting one’s own image

14. What does the photographer’s frantic behavior with the cotton sheet and window panes suggest about his character?

a) He is highly skilled and experienced in his profession

b) He is meticulous and detail-oriented in his work

c) He is overwhelmed and anxious about the photographic process

d) He is indifferent and uninterested in his surroundings

Answer: c) He is overwhelmed and anxious about the photographic process

15. How does the narrator’s emotional outburst and subsequent departure contribute to the overall tone of the story?

a) It adds humor and light-heartedness to the scene

b) It intensifies the tension and conflict between the characters

c) It highlights the narrator’s humility and self-awareness

d) It diminishes the significance of the photographer’s actions

Answer: b) It intensifies the tension and conflict between the characters

16. How does the narrator’s dissatisfaction with the photographer’s alterations to his appearance reflect broader themes of authenticity and self-acceptance?

a) It emphasizes the importance of conforming to societal beauty standards

b) It underscores the value of embracing one’s natural features and identity

c) It highlights the significance of seeking approval from others

d) It diminishes the significance of individuality and uniqueness

Answer: b) It underscores the value of embracing one’s natural features and identity

17. What might the photographer’s solemn demeanor upon revealing the photograph suggest about the nature of art and representation?

a) It implies a lack of investment in the creative process

b) It suggests a deep understanding of the complexities of identity

c) It indicates a disregard for the emotional impact of the artwork

d) It reflects a superficial approach to capturing the subject’s essence

Answer: b) It suggests a deep understanding of the complexities of identity

18. What does the photographer suggest about improving the face?

a) Turning it sideways

b) Making it three-quarters full

c) Expanding the lungs

d) Twisting the hip

Answer: b) Making it three-quarters full

19. How does the narrator respond to the photographer’s suggestion?

a) Quietly

b) Enthusiastically

c) Angrily

d) Indifferently

Answer: b) Enthusiastically

20. What does the photographer do after the narrator’s enthusiastic response?

a) Kisses the narrator

b) Twists the narrator’s face

c) Takes another look at the machine

d) Leaves the studio

Answer: b) Twists the narrator’s face

21. What does the photographer express about the head?

a) He likes it

b) He dislikes it

c) He finds it perfect

d) He wants to kiss it

Answer: b) He dislikes it

22. What does the photographer instruct the narrator to do with the mouth?

a) Open it wider

b) Close it quickly

c) Keep it closed

d) Roll it

Answer: b) Close it quickly

23. What does the photographer comment on regarding the ears?

a) They are perfect

b) They are bad

c) They are too small

d) They are missing

Answer: b) They are bad

24. What does the photographer suggest regarding the eyes?

a) Closing them

b) Rolling them in under the lids

c) Widening them

d) Lowering them

Answer: b) Rolling them in under the lids

25. What does the narrator do with the mouth in response to the photographer’s instructions?

a) Opens it wider

b) Keeps it closed

c) Closes it quickly

d) Rolls it

Answer: c) Closes it quickly

26. What action does the photographer instruct regarding the hands?

a) Placing them on the hips

b) Putting them on the knees

c) Holding them in the air

d) Crossing them

Answer: b) Putting them on the knees

27. What does the photographer want to improve about the face?

a) Its fullness

b) Its width

c) Its narrowness

d) Its depth

Answer: a) Its fullness

28. How does the photographer react to the overall outcome?

a) He likes it

b) He dislikes it

c) He finds it perfect

d) He wants to redo it

Answer: b) He dislikes it

29. What emotion does the photographer express multiple times throughout the interaction?

a) Excitement

b) Enthusiasm

c) Disappointment

d) Indifference

Answer: c) Disappointment

30. What does the photographer’s fixation on altering the narrator’s appearance suggest about societal standards of beauty?

a) Society values natural beauty over artificial enhancements

b) Society pressures individuals to conform to idealized standards

c) Society promotes self-acceptance and authenticity

d) Society encourages diversity and individuality

Answer: b) Society pressures individuals to conform to idealized standards

31. How does the narrator’s enthusiastic response to the photographer’s instructions reflect his perception of the photographer?

a) He sees the photographer as a compassionate and understanding individual

b) He views the photographer as an expert in capturing natural beauty

c) He perceives the photographer as authoritarian and intimidating

d) He interprets the photographer’s actions as a form of artistic expression

Answer: a) He sees the photographer as a compassionate and understanding individual

32. What might the photographer’s critique of the narrator’s face reveal about his artistic vision?

a) He prioritizes realism and authenticity in his portraits

b) He aims to challenge conventional notions of beauty

c) He seeks to impose his personal preferences on his subjects

d) He values technical perfection over emotional resonance

Answer: c) He seeks to impose his personal preferences on his subjects

33. How does the narrator’s reaction to the photographer’s adjustments reflect broader themes of identity and self-perception?

a) It highlights the narrator’s confidence and self-assurance

b) It underscores the narrator’s vulnerability and insecurity

c) It emphasizes the importance of individuality and uniqueness

d) It diminishes the significance of external validation

Answer: b) It underscores the narrator’s vulnerability and insecurity

34. What does the photographer’s insistence on manipulating the narrator’s appearance suggest about the nature of artistic representation?

a) It implies a disregard for the subject’s autonomy and agency

b) It indicates a commitment to capturing the subject’s essence authentically

c) It reflects a desire to challenge societal norms and expectations

d) It demonstrates an appreciation for the complexities of human expression

Answer: a) It implies a disregard for the subject’s autonomy and agency

35. What does the narrator assert about his face to the photographer?

a) It belongs to the photographer

b) It is the only one he has

c) It is perfect in every aspect

d) It needs significant alterations

Answer: b) It is the only one he has

36. What sound indicates that the photograph has been taken?

a) Snick!

b) Click!

c) Snap!

d) Crack!

Answer: a) Snick!

37. How does the photographer react to capturing the photograph?

a) With disappointment

b) With satisfaction

c) With confusion

d) With indifference

Answer: b) With satisfaction

38. What does the narrator sarcastically question the photographer about?

a) The photographer’s skills

b) The development process

c) The authenticity of the features

d) The quality of the camera

Answer: c) The authenticity of the features

39. What does the photographer inform the narrator about seeing the picture?

a) He needs to come back the next day

b) He can see it immediately

c) He has to wait for a week

d) He can never see it

Answer: a) He needs to come back the next day

40. How does the narrator describe the photographer’s demeanor when he returns on Saturday?

a) Joyful

b) Quieter and graver

c) Annoyed

d) Confused

Answer: b) Quieter and graver

41. What does the photographer unfold for the narrator to see?

a) A book

b) A painting

c) The proof of a large photograph

d) A mirror

Answer: c) The proof of a large photograph

42. What does the narrator ask the photographer about the photograph?

a) Is it his family photo?

b) Is it a famous painting?

c) Is it him?

d) Is it the photographer’s self-portrait?

Answer: c) Is it him?

43. How does the photographer respond to the narrator’s question about the photograph?

a) He remains silent

b) He denies it’s the narrator

c) He confirms it’s the narrator

d) He laughs

Answer: c) He confirms it’s the narrator

44. What is the atmosphere between the narrator and the photographer when they examine the photograph?

a) Tense

b) Joyful

c) Emotional

d) Silent

Answer: d) Silent

45. What emotion does the narrator likely feel upon seeing the photograph?

a) Pride

b) Happiness

c) Disappointment

d) Surprise

Answer: c) Disappointment

46. How does the narrator describe the experience of viewing the photograph with the photographer?

a) Exciting

b) Uncomfortable

c) Reassuring

d) Enlightening

Answer: b) Uncomfortable

47. What does the narrator’s emotional outburst about his face suggest about his relationship with self-identity?

a) He lacks self-awareness and confidence.

b) He exhibits self-acceptance and ownership of his appearance.

c) He seeks validation and approval from others.

d) He prioritizes external beauty standards over inner qualities.

Answer: b) He exhibits self-acceptance and ownership of his appearance.

48. How does the photographer’s decision to pull the string without the narrator’s consent reflect on his professional ethics?

a) It demonstrates his commitment to capturing candid moments.

b) It highlights his disregard for the subject’s autonomy and consent.

c) It showcases his innovative approach to photography.

d) It suggests his adherence to strict artistic principles.

Answer: b) It highlights his disregard for the subject’s autonomy and consent.

49. What does the narrator’s sarcastic response to the photographer’s comment about catching features in a moment of animation reveal?

a) His appreciation for the photographer’s skill and expertise.

b) His frustration with the photographer’s manipulative tactics.

c) His indifference towards the photographic process.

d) His eagerness to see the final photograph.

Answer: b) His frustration with the photographer’s manipulative tactics.

50. How does the photographer’s demeanor change when presenting the proof of the photograph on Saturday?

a) He appears more confident and assertive.

b) He seems more humble and apologetic.

c) He exhibits pride and satisfaction in his work.

d) He becomes confrontational and defensive.

Answer: c) He exhibits pride and satisfaction in his work.

51. What can be inferred about the narrator’s reaction to seeing the photograph?

a) He is pleased with the outcome and praises the photographer.

b) He feels validated and reassured about his appearance.

c) He remains uncertain and critical of the photograph.

d) He expresses disappointment and regret.

Answer: c) He remains uncertain and critical of the photograph.

52. What does the narrator express concern about regarding his eyes?

a) Their color

b) Their size

c) Their resemblance to his own

d) Their expression

Answer: c) Their resemblance to his own

53. How does the photographer respond to the narrator’s query about his eyebrows?

a) He acknowledges their difference and offers an explanation.

b) He insists they are accurate and true to life.

c) He admits to altering them using a new process.

d) He ignores the question and changes the subject.

Answer: c) He admits to altering them using a new process.

54. What process does the photographer mention for adjusting the eyebrows?

a) The Sulphide

b) The Delphide

c) The Oxide

d) The Bromide

Answer: b) The Delphide

55. How does the photographer respond to the narrator’s dissatisfaction with his mouth?

a) He explains why he couldn’t use the original mouth.

b) He promises to make further adjustments to the mouth.

c) He insists that the mouth is a good likeness.

d) He ignores the complaint entirely.

Answer: a) He explains why he couldn’t use the original mouth.

56. What does the narrator express concern about regarding his ears?

a) Their size

b) Their shape

c) Their likeness to his own

d) Their placement on the head

Answer: c) Their likeness to his own

57. How does the narrator react to the photographer’s alterations to his appearance?

a) He expresses gratitude and satisfaction.

b) He remains indifferent and passive.

c) He becomes frustrated and confrontational.

d) He feels reassured and validated.

Answer: c) He becomes frustrated and confrontational.

58. What does the narrator accuse the photographer of during his outburst?

a) Being incompetent

b) Being dishonest

c) Being cruel

d) Being insensitive

Answer: b) Being dishonest

59. What does the narrator liken the photograph to in his emotional outburst?

a) A cherished memory

b) A piece of art

c) A worthless bauble

d) A precious heirloom

Answer: c) A worthless bauble

60. How does the narrator leave the photographer’s studio?

a) Laughing

b) In tears

c) Angry

d) Content

Answer: b) In tears

61. What does the narrator emphasize about his face during his outburst?

a) Its perfection

b) Its flaws

c) Its uniqueness

d) Its symmetry

Answer: c) Its uniqueness

62. How does the photographer respond to the narrator’s emotional outburst?

a) He apologizes and offers to redo the photograph.

b) He ignores the narrator and continues with his work.

c) He becomes defensive and confrontational.

d) He remains calm and detached.

Answer: b) He ignores the narrator and continues with his work.

63. What does the narrator ultimately decide about the photograph?

a) To keep it for himself and his friends.

b) To hang it in his home.

c) To destroy it.

d) To give it to the photographer as a gift.

Answer: a) To keep it for himself and his friends.

64. What does the narrator’s outburst about the photograph reveal about his values?

a) He prioritizes vanity and superficial appearance.

b) He values authenticity and individuality in portrayal.

c) He seeks perfection in photographic representation.

d) He prioritizes pleasing others over self-expression.

Answer: b) He values authenticity and individuality in portrayal.

65. How does the photographer’s response to the narrator’s comments about the eyebrows reflect his approach?

a) He acknowledges the narrator’s concerns and offers solutions.

b) He dismisses the narrator’s objections and proceeds with alterations.

c) He seeks the narrator’s input to improve the final outcome.

d) He empathizes with the narrator’s discomfort and stops the process.

Answer: b) He dismisses the narrator’s objections and proceeds with alterations.

66. What does the narrator’s reference to Heaven giving him his face imply about his perception of self?

a) He views his appearance as a divine gift to be cherished.

b) He considers his appearance as inconsequential and unimportant.

c) He believes his appearance reflects societal ideals of beauty.

d) He feels insecure about his appearance and seeks validation.

Answer: a) He views his appearance as a divine gift to be cherished.

67. How does the narrator’s emotional response to the photographer’s actions contribute to the theme of identity?

a) It highlights the narrator’s vanity and obsession with appearance.

b) It emphasizes the narrator’s struggle to assert his true self against external pressures.

c) It showcases the narrator’s indifference towards his own image.

d) It underscores the narrator’s acceptance of societal beauty standards.

Answer: b) It emphasizes the narrator’s struggle to assert his true self against external pressures.

68. What can be inferred about the narrator’s decision to leave after his emotional outburst?

a) He feels relieved and satisfied with his confrontation.

b) He regrets his actions and seeks reconciliation.

c) He realizes the futility of his argument and accepts defeat.

d) He feels defeated and overwhelmed by the situation.

Answer: d) He feels defeated and overwhelmed by the situation.

With the Photographer Questions Answers SAQ Extract-Based

This resource offers Short Answer Questions (SAQ) based on excerpts from “With the Photographer” by Stephen Leacock. Students are prompted to provide concise responses, demonstrating their understanding of key events.

With the Photographer Questions Answers SAQ 1:

Read the following extract from Stephen Leacock’s short story, ‘With the Photographer’ and answer the questions that follow:

Extract: “I WANT my photograph taken,” I said. The photographer looked at me without enthusiasm. He was a drooping man in a gray suit, with the dim eye of a natural scientist. But there is no need to describe him. Everybody knows what a photographer is like.

1. What does the narrator’s desire to have his photograph taken reveal about his character in “With the Photographer” by Stephen Leacock?

Ans: The narrator’s desire to have his photograph taken suggests that he may be vain or self-conscious about his appearance. It also indicates a certain level of self-importance or desire for validation, as he seeks to capture his image through photography.

2. How does the photographer’s appearance and demeanor contribute to the atmosphere of the scene in the excerpt from “With the Photographer” by Stephen Leacock?

Ans: The photographer’s appearance, described as a drooping man in a gray suit with the dim eye of a natural scientist, contributes to a sense of disinterest or indifference. His lack of enthusiasm reflects a mundane attitude towards his profession, perhaps hinting at a certain level of cynicism or weariness with his job. This characterization helps establish the atmosphere of the scene as one of routine and lackluster engagement.

3. How does Leacock’s portrayal of the photographer as a disinterested and indifferent figure contrast with the narrator’s enthusiasm for having his photograph taken, and what might this reveal about the broader themes or social commentary within the story?

Ans: Leacock’s portrayal of the photographer as disinterested contrasts with the narrator’s enthusiasm, highlighting a disconnect between their attitudes towards photography. This dichotomy reflects societal norms, self-image, and perception, prompting reflection on individuality, authenticity, and the commodification of image in modern society, as well as the societal constructs surrounding photography.

With the Photographer Questions Answers SAQ 2:

Read the following extract from Stephen Leacock’s short story, ‘With the Photographer’ and answer the questions that follow:

Extract: : “Sit there,” ” he said, “and wait.”

I waited an hour. I read the Ladies Companion for 1912, the Girls Magazine for 1902 and the Infants Journal for 1888. I began to see that I had done an unwarrantable thing in breaking in on the privacy of this man’s scientific pursuits with a face like mine. 

1. What does the narrator’s choice of reading material while waiting in the photographer’s studio reveal about his surroundings and the passage of time in “With the Photographer” by Stephen Leacock?

Answer: The narrator’s choice of reading material, which includes magazines from 1888, 1902, and 1912, suggests that the photographer’s studio is filled with outdated or old-fashioned items. This indicates a stagnant or unchanged environment, where time seems to have stood still. Additionally, it emphasizes the prolonged nature of the narrator’s wait, as he resorts to reading material from different eras to pass the time.

2. How does the narrator’s realization about “breaking in on the privacy” of the photographer’s scientific pursuits contribute to the development of the story’s themes in “With the Photographer” by Stephen Leacock?

Answer: The narrator’s realization about intruding on the photographer’s privacy with his presence highlights themes of self-awareness, social boundaries, and the impact of appearances. By acknowledging that his face may not align with the photographer’s scientific pursuits, the narrator becomes aware of the potential disruption he has caused. This realization prompts introspection about societal norms and expectations, as well as the dynamics of power and control within the encounter.

3. In what ways does the narrator’s experience of waiting for an hour in the photographer’s studio reflect broader themes of alienation and discomfort in “With the Photographer” by Stephen Leacock?

Answer: The narrator’s experience of waiting for an hour in the photographer’s studio reflects broader themes of alienation and discomfort by portraying a sense of isolation and unease. As he sits alone, surrounded by outdated reading material, the narrator grapples with feelings of boredom and frustration, compounded by his growing awareness of his intrusion into the photographer’s space. This sense of alienation underscores the disconnect between the narrator’s expectations and the reality of the situation, highlighting the tension between individual desire and societal norms.

With the Photographer Questions Answers SAQ 3:

Read the following extract from Stephen Leacock’s short story, ‘With the Photographer’ and answer the questions that follow:

Extract: After an hour the photographer opened the inner door.

“Come in,” he said severely.

I went into the studio.

“Sit down,” said the photographer.

I sat down in a beam of sunlight filtered through a sheet of factory cotton hung against a frosted skylight.

The photographer rolled a machine into the middle of the room and crawled into it from behind.

1. What atmosphere does the photographer’s severity create when he instructs the narrator to enter the studio in “With the Photographer”?

Answer: The photographer’s severity creates a tense atmosphere, suggesting a strict and authoritarian dynamic between him and the narrator.

2. How does the narrator’s interaction with the sunlight contribute to the setting’s ambiance?

Answer: The narrator’s placement in the sunlight adds a touch of warmth and illumination to the otherwise stark studio environment, contrasting with the photographer’s cold demeanor.

3. What does the photographer’s action of crawling into the machine from behind symbolize in the context of the story?

Answer: The photographer’s action symbolizes a detachment from the human element, emphasizing a mechanical approach to photography and perhaps reflecting themes of dehumanization and impersonalization in modern society.

With the Photographer Questions Answers SAQ 4:

Read the following extract from Stephen Leacock’s short story, ‘With the Photographer’ and answer the questions that follow:

Extract:  He was only in it a second,-just time enough for one look at me, and then he was out again, tearing at the cotton sheet and the window panes with a hooked stick, apparently frantic for light and air.

Then he crawled back into the machine again and drew a little black cloth over himself. This time he was very quiet in there. I knew that he was praying and I kept still. When the photographer came out at last, he looked very grave and shook his head.

1. What does the photographer’s frantic behavior with the cotton sheet and window panes suggest about his approach to photography?

Answer: The photographer’s frantic behavior suggests a desperate need for optimal lighting conditions, indicating his dedication to capturing the perfect image.

2. What might the narrator’s assumption that the photographer was praying reveal about their perception of the photographer’s actions?

Answer: The narrator’s assumption suggests a sense of reverence or respect for the photographer’s process, interpreting his actions within a spiritual or ritualistic context.

3. How does the photographer’s grave demeanor and head shaking upon exiting the machine impact the mood of the scene?

Answer: The photographer’s grave demeanor and head shaking contribute to a sense of foreboding and uncertainty, hinting at potential dissatisfaction or disappointment with the outcome of the photographic process.

4. What could be inferred about the photographer’s internal thoughts or emotions during his quiet time inside the machine?

Answer: The photographer’s quiet demeanor inside the machine implies a moment of introspection or concentration, suggesting he may be deeply focused on his craft or grappling with internal challenges related to his work.

With the Photographer Questions Answers SAQ 5:

Read the following extract from Stephen Leacock’s short story, ‘With the Photographer’ and answer the questions that follow:

Extract: The face is quite wrong”, he said.

“I know,” I answered quietly; “I have always known it.” He sighed.

“I think,” he said, “the face would be better three-quarters full.”

“I’m sure it would,” I said enthusiastically, for I was glad to find that the man had such a human side to him. “So would yours. In fact,” I continued, “how many faces one sees that are apparently hard, narrow, limited, but the minute you get them three-quarters full they get wide, large, almost boundless in–“

1. What does the photographer’s critique of the narrator’s face reveal about their interaction in “With the Photographer”?

Answer: The photographer’s critique suggests a level of professional honesty and a desire for perfection in his work, while also hinting at a deeper understanding of human imperfections.

2. How does the narrator’s response to the photographer’s critique demonstrate their attitude towards criticism?

Answer: The narrator’s quiet acceptance of the critique demonstrates humility and self-awareness, indicating a willingness to acknowledge their own shortcomings.

3. What does the photographer’s suggestion of capturing the face three-quarters full imply about his artistic vision?

Answer: The suggestion implies that the photographer values capturing depth and dimension in his portraits, seeking to reveal more nuanced aspects of his subjects’ personalities and features.

4. How does the narrator’s enthusiastic response to the photographer’s suggestion reflect their perception of the photographer?

Answer: The narrator’s enthusiasm suggests admiration for the photographer’s insight and skill, as well as a desire to establish rapport and connection with him.

5. What broader commentary might the narrator’s reflection on faces being “hard, narrow, limited” suggest in the context of the story?

Answer: The narrator’s reflection suggests a deeper exploration of human complexity and the transformative power of perspective, hinting at themes of empathy, understanding, and the capacity for growth and change.

With the Photographer Questions Answers SAQ 6:

Read the following extract from Stephen Leacock’s short story, ‘With the Photographer’ and answer the questions that follow:

Extract: But the photographer had ceased to listen. He came over and took my head in his hands and twisted it sideways. I thought he meant to kiss me, and I closed my eyes. 

But I was wrong.

He twisted my face as far as it would go and then stood

looking at it.

He sighed again.

“I don’t like the head,” he said.

Then he went back to the machine and took another look.

“Open the mouth a little,” he said.

I started to do so.

“Close it,” he added quickly.

Then he looked again.

1. What does the photographer’s action of twisting the narrator’s head sideways signify about his approach to capturing the photograph?

Answer: The photographer’s action suggests a meticulous attention to detail and a quest for the ideal angle to capture the subject’s features effectively.

2. How does the narrator’s initial misunderstanding of the photographer’s intentions contribute to the tone of the scene?

Answer: The narrator’s misunderstanding adds a touch of humor and irony to the scene, contrasting with the serious and methodical nature of the photographer’s actions.

3. What does the photographer’s sighing indicate about his assessment of the situation?

Answer: The photographer’s sighing suggests frustration or dissatisfaction with the results so far, hinting at his high standards and commitment to achieving perfection in his work.

4. How does the photographer’s instruction to “open the mouth a little” followed by a quick “close it” reflect his attention to minute details?

Answer: The photographer’s precise instructions demonstrate his meticulous focus on every aspect of the subject’s appearance, emphasizing his dedication to achieving the desired outcome.

5. What might the photographer’s repeated looks at the machine imply about his methodology or artistic process?

Answer: The photographer’s repeated looks at the machine suggest a reliance on technology or equipment to aid in his artistic process, highlighting a fusion of traditional craftsmanship with modern tools to achieve his vision.

With the Photographer Questions Answers SAQ 7:

Read the following extract from Stephen Leacock’s short story, ‘With the Photographer’ and answer the questions that follow:

Extract: “The ears are bad,” he said; “droop them a little more. Thank you. Now the eyes. Roll them in under the lids. Put the hands on the knees, please, and turn the face just a little upward. Yes, that’s better. Now just expand the lungs! So! And hump the neck-that’s it-and just contract the waist-ha!- and twist the hip up toward the elbow – now! I still don’t quite like the face, it’s just a trifle too full, but–

1. How does the photographer’s detailed instructions contribute to the portrayal of his character in “With the Photographer”?

Answer: The photographer’s meticulous instructions showcase his perfectionism and expertise, revealing his commitment to achieving the desired outcome in his work.

2. What does the photographer’s dissatisfaction with the face’s fullness suggest about his artistic standards and expectations?

Answer: The photographer’s dissatisfaction suggests that he holds high standards for facial proportions and expressions in his portraits, indicating his pursuit of aesthetic perfection and attention to detail.

With the Photographer Questions Answers SAQ 8:

Read the following extract from Stephen Leacock’s short story, ‘With the Photographer’ and answer the questions that follow:

Extract:I swung myself round on the stool.

“Stop,” I said with emotion but, I think, with dignity. “This face is my face. It is not yours, it is mine. I’ve lived with it for forty years and I know its faults. I know it’s out of drawing. I know it wasn’t made for me, but it’s my face, the only one I have” “such as I was conscious of a break in my voice but I went on-” it is, I’ve learned to love it. And this is my mouth, not yours. These ears are mine, and if your machine is too narrow-“Here I started to rise from the seat.

1. What does the narrator’s emotional outburst reveal about his relationship with his own appearance in “With the Photographer”?

Answer: The narrator’s emotional outburst demonstrates his deep attachment to his own identity and physical features, highlighting a sense of self-acceptance and pride despite perceived flaws.

2. How does the narrator’s assertion of ownership over his face challenge the photographer’s authority and expertise?

Answer: The narrator’s assertion challenges the photographer’s authority by asserting his autonomy and personal connection to his own appearance, emphasizing the subjective nature of beauty and identity.

3. What might the narrator’s reaction suggest about broader themes of self-esteem and empowerment in the story?

Answer: The narrator’s reaction suggests themes of self-esteem and empowerment, as he refuses to yield to external judgments or standards of beauty, asserting his right to define and embrace his own identity.

With the Photographer Questions Answers SAQ 9:

Read the following extract from Stephen Leacock’s short story, ‘With the Photographer’ and answer the questions that follow:

Extract:The photographer had pulled a string. The photograph taken. I could see the machine still staggering from the shock.

“I think,” said the photographer, pursing his lips in a pleased smile, “that I caught the features just in a moment of animation.”

“So!” I said bitingly,-“features, eh? You didn’t think I could animate them, I suppose? But let me see the picture.”

“Oh, there’s nothing to see yet,” he said, “I have to develop the negative first. Come back on Saturday and I’ll let you see a proof of it.”

On Saturday I went back.

The photographer beckoned me in. I thought he seemed quieter and graver than before. I think, too, there was a certain pride in his manner. 

He unfolded the proof of a large photograph, and we both looked at it in silence.

“Is it me?” I asked.

“Yes,” he said quietly, “it is you,” and we went on looking at it…!

1. What action does the photographer take after pulling the string, and how does it affect the machine?

Answer: The photographer takes a photograph, causing the machine to stagger from the shock.

2. How does the photographer describe the captured features, and how does the narrator respond?

Answer: The photographer describes the features as captured “just in a moment of animation.” The narrator responds with a biting remark questioning the photographer’s assumptions.

3. When does the photographer suggest the narrator can see the picture?

Answer: The photographer suggests the narrator can see the picture after he develops the negative, asking the narrator to return on Saturday.

4. What is the narrator’s impression of the photographer when he returns on Saturday?

Answer: The narrator senses a quieter and graver demeanor in the photographer, with a hint of pride in his manner.

5. What does the photographer reveal to the narrator upon their meeting on Saturday?

Answer: The photographer reveals a proof of a large photograph to the narrator.

6. Whose image does the photograph depict?

Answer: The photograph depicts the narrator’s image.

7. How do the photographer and the narrator react to seeing the photograph?

Answer: They both look at the photograph in silence, with the narrator questioning if it’s him and the photographer confirming quietly that it is indeed the narrator.

With the Photographer Questions Answers SAQ 10:

Read the following extract from Stephen Leacock’s short story, ‘With the Photographer’ and answer the questions that follow:

Extract:The eyes,” ,” I said hesitatingly, “don’t look very much like mine”

“Oh, no,” he answered, “I’ve retouched them. They come out splendidly, don’t they?”

“Fine,” I said, “but surely my eyebrows are not like that?” 

1. How does the photographer respond to the narrator’s observation about the eyes not resembling his own?

Answer: The photographer responds by stating that he has retouched them and remarks on their splendid appearance.

2. What aspect of the narrator’s appearance does he question next?

Answer: The narrator questions the appearance of his eyebrows next, expressing doubt about their likeness.

With the Photographer Questions Answers SAQ 11:

Read the following extract from Stephen Leacock’s short story, ‘With the Photographer’ and answer the questions that follow:

Extract:“No,” said the photographer, with a momentary glance at my face, “the eyebrows are removed. We have a process now the Delphide-for putting in new ones. You’ll notice here where we’ve applied it to carry the hair away from the brow. I don’t like the hair low on the skull.”

1. What does the photographer reveal about the eyebrows, and how does he justify their removal?

Answer: The photographer reveals that the eyebrows have been removed and justifies it by mentioning a process called Delphide for putting in new ones, aiming for a preferred appearance.

2. What specific concern does the photographer express about the hair on the skull?

Answer: The photographer expresses a dislike for the hair being low on the skull, suggesting a preference for a different hairline or styling.

3. How does the narrator respond to the photographer’s alterations to his appearance?

Answer: The narrator’s response isn’t explicitly mentioned, but he likely reacts with surprise or discomfort, given the drastic changes made to his features without his consent.

With the Photographer Questions Answers SAQ 12:

Read the following extract from Stephen Leacock’s short story, ‘With the Photographer’ and answer the questions that follow:

Extract:“Oh, you don’t, don’t you?” I said.

“No,” he went on, “I don’t care for it. I like to get the hair clear back to the superficies and make out a new brow line.”

“What about the mouth?” I said with a bitterness that was lost on the photographer; “is that mine?”

“It’s adjusted a little,” he said, “yours is too low. I found I

couldn’t use it.”

“The ears, though,” I said, “strike me as a good likeness;

they’re just like mine.”

“Yes,” said the photographer thoughtfully, “that’s so; but I can fix that all right in the print. We have a process now-the Sulphide- for removing the ears entirely. I’ll see if–“

1. How does the narrator express his disagreement with the photographer’s alterations?

Answer: The narrator expresses disagreement by questioning the changes made to his features with a remark, “Oh, you don’t, don’t you?”

2. What does the photographer prefer regarding the hair?

Answer: The photographer prefers to clear the hair back to the superficies and establish a new brow line.

3. How does the narrator inquire about his mouth?

Answer: The narrator questions if the mouth depicted is his, expressing bitterness, but the photographer remains unaffected.

4. How does the photographer respond to the question about the mouth?

Answer: The photographer admits to adjusting the mouth because the narrator’s was too low and couldn’t be used.

5. What aspect of the ears does the narrator find similar?

Answer: The narrator finds the ears to be a good likeness and remarks that they’re just like his.

6. How does the photographer suggest addressing the similarity of the ears?

Answer: The photographer suggests fixing the similarity in the print using a process called Sulphide for removing the ears entirely.

7. How does the photographer respond to the narrator’s observation about the ears?

Answer: The photographer responds thoughtfully, acknowledging the similarity and suggesting a solution to address it in the print.

With the Photographer Questions Answers SAQ 13:

Read the following extract from Stephen Leacock’s short story, ‘With the Photographer’ and answer the questions that follow:

Extract:“Listen!” I interrupted, drawing myself up and animating my features to their full extent and speaking with a withering scorn that should have blasted the man on the spot. “Listen! I came here for a photograph-a picture-something which (mad though it seems) would have looked like me and I wanted something that would depict my face as Heaven gave it to me, humble though the gift may have been and I wanted something that my friends might keep after my death, to reconcile them to loss. It seems that I was mistaken. What I wanted is no longer done.

1. What does the narrator express as his intention for the photograph?

Answer: The narrator expresses his desire for a photograph that resembles him naturally, as a humble gift from Heaven, to console his friends after his death.

2. How does the narrator convey his disappointment with the photographer’s approach?

Answer: The narrator interrupts forcefully, expressing withering scorn and disappointment at the photographer’s failure to capture his natural appearance.

3. What does the narrator imply about the current practice of photography?

Answer: The narrator implies that modern photography no longer produces images that reflect the natural appearance of individuals but instead relies on artificial alterations.

4. How does the narrator’s speech reflect his frustration and disillusionment?

Answer: The narrator’s speech is filled with frustration and disillusionment as he expresses his disappointment at not being able to obtain a photograph that truly resembles him as he is.

With the Photographer Questions Answers SAQ 14:

Read the following extract from Stephen Leacock’s short story, ‘With the Photographer’ and answer the questions that follow:

Extract: done. Go on, then, with your brutal work. Take your negative, or whatever it is you call it,-dip it in sulphide, bromide, oxide, cowhide, anything you like,-remove the eyes, correct the mouth, adjust the face, restore the lips, reanimate the necktie and reconstruct the waistcoat. Coat it with an inch of gloss, shade it, emboss it, gild it, till even you acknowledge that it is finished. Then when you have done all that-keep it for yourself and your friends. They may value it. To me it is but a worthless bauble.”

I broke into tears and left.

1. How does the narrator mockingly describe the photographer’s work process?

Answer: The narrator mockingly suggests various chemical processes and alterations, including dipping in sulphide, bromide, oxide, cowhide, to transform the image beyond recognition.

2. What does the narrator express about the value of the finished photograph?

Answer: The narrator expresses disdain for the finished photograph, considering it a worthless bauble devoid of personal significance.

3. How does the narrator react emotionally to the situation?

Answer: The narrator breaks into tears, indicating deep emotional distress and frustration.

4. What does the narrator ultimately decide to do?

Answer: The narrator decides to leave, rejecting the photographer’s alterations and the resulting photograph.

5. What does the narrator suggest the photographer should do with the finished photograph?

Answer: The narrator suggests that the photographer and his friends may value the finished photograph, but it holds no value for the narrator.

6. What tone does the narrator adopt in addressing the photographer’s work?

Answer: The narrator adopts a tone of sarcasm and bitterness in addressing the photographer’s work process and the resulting photograph.

7. How does the narrator’s speech convey his disillusionment with the outcome?

Answer: The narrator’s speech conveys disillusionment through the rejection of the photograph as a worthless bauble, emphasizing the lack of personal meaning or value attributed to it.